1. fetishweekly:

    This week’s rope: Side Hitch Harness
    Model: Hazel Maybrook

     
  2. 23:00

    Notes: 129336

    Reblogged from mikalopsia

    Tags: Here have a kittyKindaQueue it up!

    thefrogman:

    There is also a death for the immortal jellyfish. He is very bored.

    Artwork by Chris Gugliotti [webcomic | tumblr]

     
  3. 22:30

    Notes: 100747

    Reblogged from mikalopsia

    Tags: ArtBookWowQueue it up!

    mikalopsia:

    thatsnicebutimmarried:

    mylifeasaheadcrab:

    Skull sculpture made from books by Artist Maskull Lasserre.

    WHY WOULD YOU RUIN PERFECTLY GOOD BOOKS

    Yes, how dare someone ruin literary classics like, “Internet Explorer 4 in Action” and ‘Database Developer’s Guide”

    I swear, someone needs to inform Tumblr of ‘multiple copies’.

    (Source: gaksdesigns)

     
  4. 22:00

    Notes: 166

    Reblogged from spookykaiju

    Tags: HpQueue it up!

    wizardhistory:


Azkaban Prison isn’t the only wizarding prison, in fact, there are countless others, scattered across world—some hidden in the dark necks mountains or submerged beneath deep pools of still waters, or even hidden in plain sight. 
In the medieval wizarding age, one of the strongest prisons built was created on Avalon island, which today is now cloaked and hidden, somewhere in the Irish sea. It was created by the wizard Merlin, who was known to have a great quarrel with the witch Morgan Le Fey, and there imprisoned her for her crimes against the muggles on the coast of Wales. 
Though today, some wizarding historians believe Morgan’s prison was very cruel, most believe it was an act of heroics by Merlin. No crime was truly cited for her imprisonment—varying in tales from cursing the peasantry to raising an army of inferi. 
The prison still stands today, on a small island in which the great lady once lived in, and then, by Merlin’s command, lived there the rest of her days.
The island of Avalon disappeared soon after, only to be rediscovered by the W.A.G.O.W. (Wizarding Archaeologist Guild of Wales) in the late 1870s. The castle was investigated for only a month before the Ministry of Magic banned all research on Avalon, and magicked it back into the shadows—now drifting somewhere, hidden and barely touched.
The W.A.G.O.W. claim that no remains were found of the Lady Morgan, and no sign of a ghost lingered either. Some suggest she, being a witch of great abilities, managed to break Merlin’s hold on her prison, though this remains unproven.

Mr. A. Whitestaff, the 11th of October, 2014.

    wizardhistory:

    Azkaban Prison isn’t the only wizarding prison, in fact, there are countless others, scattered across world—some hidden in the dark necks mountains or submerged beneath deep pools of still waters, or even hidden in plain sight. 

    In the medieval wizarding age, one of the strongest prisons built was created on Avalon island, which today is now cloaked and hidden, somewhere in the Irish sea. It was created by the wizard Merlin, who was known to have a great quarrel with the witch Morgan Le Fey, and there imprisoned her for her crimes against the muggles on the coast of Wales. 

    Though today, some wizarding historians believe Morgan’s prison was very cruel, most believe it was an act of heroics by Merlin. No crime was truly cited for her imprisonment—varying in tales from cursing the peasantry to raising an army of inferi. 

    The prison still stands today, on a small island in which the great lady once lived in, and then, by Merlin’s command, lived there the rest of her days.

    The island of Avalon disappeared soon after, only to be rediscovered by the W.A.G.O.W. (Wizarding Archaeologist Guild of Wales) in the late 1870s. The castle was investigated for only a month before the Ministry of Magic banned all research on Avalon, and magicked it back into the shadows—now drifting somewhere, hidden and barely touched.

    The W.A.G.O.W. claim that no remains were found of the Lady Morgan, and no sign of a ghost lingered either. Some suggest she, being a witch of great abilities, managed to break Merlin’s hold on her prison, though this remains unproven.

    Mr. A. Whitestaff, the 11th of October, 2014.

    (Source: through-the-thorns-to-the-stars)

     
  5. 21:30

    Notes: 9581

    Reblogged from spookykaiju

    Tags: ArtWolfQueue it up!

    oukamiyoukai45
    wood wolves

    (Source: ghostofleo)

     
  6. 01:20

    Notes: 27326

    Reblogged from duchesscloverly

    Tags: alan rickman

    riddle-me-chris:

    Kind of afraid to ask Alan Rickman for his autograph.

     
  7. tastefullyoffensive:

This is what happens when you don’t separate your colors and whites.[via]

    tastefullyoffensive:

    This is what happens when you don’t separate your colors and whites.

    [via]

     
  8. 01:15

    Notes: 317759

    Reblogged from profligates

    image: Download

    stigmartyr762:

transcendingdiimensions:

almostnormalboy:

mushaka:

santosha65:


This incredible photo marks the end of Matador Torero Alvaro Munera’s career. He collapsed in remorse mid-fight when he realized he was having to prompt this otherwise gentle beast to fight. He went on to become an avid opponent of bullfights. Even grievously wounded by picadors, he did not attack this man.
Torrero Munera is quoted as saying of this moment: “And suddenly, I looked at the bull. He had this innocence that all animals have in their eyes, and he looked at me with this pleading. It was like a cry for justice, deep down inside of me. I describe it as being like a prayer - because if one confesses, it is hoped, that one is forgiven. I felt like the worst shit on earth.”


I’ve reblogged this at least two other times but this is possibly one of my favorite photos ever.

The bull is just like ‘hey r u ok?’ it’s so powerful

I’m going to cry :c

This is a practice that needs to end.

    stigmartyr762:

    transcendingdiimensions:

    almostnormalboy:

    mushaka:

    santosha65:

    This incredible photo marks the end of Matador Torero Alvaro Munera’s career. He collapsed in remorse mid-fight when he realized he was having to prompt this otherwise gentle beast to fight. He went on to become an avid opponent of bullfights. Even grievously wounded by picadors, he did not attack this man.

    Torrero Munera is quoted as saying of this moment: “And suddenly, I looked at the bull. He had this innocence that all animals have in their eyes, and he looked at me with this pleading. It was like a cry for justice, deep down inside of me. I describe it as being like a prayer - because if one confesses, it is hoped, that one is forgiven. I felt like the worst shit on earth.”

    I’ve reblogged this at least two other times but this is possibly one of my favorite photos ever.

    The bull is just like ‘hey r u ok?’ it’s so powerful

    I’m going to cry :c

    This is a practice that needs to end.

    (Source: ihavetopeerealbad)

     
  9. 01:14

    Notes: 41260

    Reblogged from hufflepufffind

    Tags: Book of life

    lalivingmuerte:

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    i think this could be useful for the people who is not totally sure about spend their money in this movie, it has their good and bad points, but generally is a great movie, so please, let’s show them that “An Hispanic story” can be as good as any other one, or even better!. 

     
  10. 01:09

    Notes: 56174

    Reblogged from profligates

    ereboreanbadger:

    Ravenclaw: Do it once you’ve gathered enough relevant information.
    Hufflepuff: Do it with integrity.
    Slytherin: Do it on your own terms.

    Gryffindor: Do it for the vine.

     
  11. 01:09

    Notes: 16740

    Reblogged from hufflepufffind

    misandry-mermaid:

    unwinona:

    THIS

    This is how you feminist ally.

    (Source: psychedellicwonderland)

     
  12. 01:08

    Notes: 92458

    Reblogged from sn00z-cru

    Tags: Visit

    The Moon sets behind the temple of Poseidon at Sounio 

    (Source: expose-the-light)

     
  13. 01:07

    Notes: 1458

    Reblogged from profligates

    Tags: Gaming

    elghoul-nan:

    officialvarrictethras:

    like

    why do darkspawn have money?

    is there a darkspawn market somewhere?

    did i just kill them for their lunch money????????

    The Archdemon kissing each and every Darkspawn forehead as they leave, giving them lunch money and making sure their sword is sharp enough before wiping its claws on its floral apron and returning to itss hiding spot

     
  14. 01:05

    Notes: 14008

    Reblogged from hufflepufffind

    Tags: ArtHistory

    cannelledusoleil:

    female-only:

    plansfornigel:

    Image and video hosting by TinyPic

    Female figurine from the Hohle Fels cave near Stuttgart, about 35,000 years old. Interpreted as a pornographic pin-up.

    “The Earliest Pornography” says Science Now, describing the 35,000 year old ivory figurine that’s been dug up in a cave near Stuttgart. The tiny statuette is of a female with exaggerated breasts and vulva. According to Paul Mellars, one of the archaeologist twits who commented on the find for Nature, this makes the figurine “pornographic.” Nature is even titling its article, “Prehistoric Pin Up.” It’s the Venus of Willendorf double standard all over again. Ancient figures of naked pregnant women are interpreted by smirking male archaeologists as pornography, while equally sexualized images of men are assumed to depict gods or shamans. Or even hunters or warriors. Funny, huh?

    Consider: phallic images from the Paleolithic are at least 28,000 years old. Neolithic cultures all over the world seemed to have a thing for sculptures with enormous erect phalluses. Ancient civilizations were awash in images of male genitalia, from the Indian lingam to the Egyptian benben to the Greek herm. The Romans even painted phalluses on their doors and wore phallic charms around their necks.

    Image and video hosting by TinyPicIthyphallic figure from Lascaux, about 17,000 years old. Interpreted as a shaman.

    But nobody ever interprets this ancient phallic imagery as pornography. Instead, it’s understood to indicate reverence for male sexual potency. No one, for example, has ever suggested that the Lascaux cave dude was a pin-up; he’s assumed to be a shaman. The ithyphallic figurines from the Neolithic — and there are many — are interpreted as gods. And everyone knows that the phalluses of ancient India and Egypt and Greece and Rome represented awesome divine powers of fertility and protection. Yet an ancient figurine of a nude woman — a life-giving woman, with her vulva ready to bring forth a new human being, and her milk-filled breasts ready to nourish that being — is interpreted as pornography. Just something for a man to whack off to. It’s not as if there’s no other context in which to interpret the figure. After all, the European Paleolithic is chock full of pregnant-looking female statuettes that are quite similar to this one. By the time we get to the Neolithic, the naked pregnant female is enthroned with lions at her feet, and it’s clear that people are worshipping some kind of female god.

    Yet in the Science Now article, the archaeologist who found the figurine is talking about pornographic pin-ups: “I showed it to a male colleague, and his response was, ‘Nothing’s changed in 40,000 years.’” That sentence needs to be bronzed and hung up on a plaque somewhere, because you couldn’t ask for a better demonstration of the classic fallacy of reading the present into the past. The archaeologist assumes the artist who created the figurine was male; why? He assumes the motive was lust; why? Because that’s all he knows. To his mind, the image of a naked woman with big breasts and exposed vulva can only mean one thing: porn! Porn made by men, for men! And so he assumes, without questioning his assumptions, that the image must have meant the same thing 35,000 years ago. No other mental categories for “naked woman” are available to him. His mind is a closed box. This has been the central flaw of anthropology for as long there’s been anthropology. And even before: the English invaders of North America thought the Iroquois chiefs had concubines who accompanied them everywhere, because they had no other mental categories to account for well-dressed, important-looking women sitting in a council house. It’s the same fallacy that bedevils archaeologists who dig up male skeletons with fancy beads and conclude that the society was male dominant (because powerful people wear jewelry!), and at another site dig up female skeletons with fancy beads and conclude that this society, too, was male dominant (because women have to dress up as sex objects and trophy wives!). Male dominance is all they can imagine. And so no matter what they dig up, they interpret it to fit their mental model. It’s the fallacy that also drives evolutionary psychology, the central premise of which is that human beings in the African Pleistocene had exactly the same values, beliefs, prejudices, power struggles, goals, and needs as the middle-class white professors and students in a graduate psychology lab in modern-day Santa Barbara, California. And that these same factors are universal and unchanged and true for all time.

    Image and video hosting by TinyPicHohle Fels phallus, about 28,000 years old. Interpreted as a symbolic object and …flint knapper. Yes.

    That’s not science; it’s circular, self-serving propaganda. This little figurine from Hohle Fels, for example, is going to be used as “proof” that pornography is ancient and natural. I guarantee it. Having been interpreted by pornsick male archaeologists as pornography because that’s all they know, the statuette will now be trotted out by every ev psycho and male supremacist on the planet as “proof” that pornography is eternal, that male dominance is how it’s supposed to be, and that feminists are crazy so shut the fuck up. Look for it in Steven Pinker’s next book. ***

    P.S. My own completely speculative guess on the figurine is that it might be connected to childbirth rituals. Notice the engraved marks and slashes; that’s a motif that continues for thousands of years on these little female figurines. No one knows what they mean, but they meant something. They’re not just random cut marks. Someone put a great deal of work into this sculpture. Given that childbirth was incredibly risky for Paleolithic women, they must have prayed their hearts out for help and protection in that time. I can imagine an elder female shaman or artist carving this potent little figure, and propping it up somewhere as a focus for those prayers.

    On the other hand, it is possible that it has nothing to do with childbearing or sexual behavior at all. The breasts and vulva may simply indicate who the figure is: the female god. Think of how Christ is always depicted with a beard, which is a male sexual characteristic, even though Christ isn’t about male sexuality. The beard is just a marker. Or, given the figurine’s exaggerated breasts, it may have something to do with sustenance: milk, food, nourishment.

    The notion that some dude carved this thing to whack off to — when he was surrounded by women who probably weren’t wearing much in the way of clothes anyway — is laughable.

    Good lord I am so glad I took ancient art from a female professor.

     
  15. 01:02

    Notes: 155

    Reblogged from autisticfandomthings

    blackfemalescientist:

    I have no interest in recruiting under-respresented minorities (women, black americans, native americans and latino americans) into the sciences. Every time i think about it I think of that MLK quote about integrating people into a burning house. The environment is…